Shoot Better Cityscapes

Cityscape of New York City Skyline at dusk

Cityscape of New York City Skyline at dusk

With the recent explosion of photo-sharing sites on the web, it seems that landscape photography is at an all-time high. I’m consistently blown away by the caliber of imagery I see being captured the world over on a daily basis. Along with this ever-present promotion of far-flung, corner-of-the-world places comes the desire to travel to the ends of the earth to capture the most dramatic image of places few knew existed.

Did you know that over half of the world population lives in urban areas, however? This means that over 3.5 billion of us live in or near cities. Which means it’s time to polish up on those cityscape skills of yours! I enjoy shooting these concrete jungles, and with a little practice, you might find they begin to occupy a gaping hole in your travel portfolio. Read on for a few tips on how to shoot better cityscape images!

1. Shoot at Dawn and/or Dusk
This is the no-brainer, super straight-forward, can’t go wrong tip. Dawn and dusk (just before sunrise and just after sunset) are the periods of day and night when the ambient (existing) light balances with the artificial light from buildings, street lamps, cars, etc. The sky turns a deep, rich blue or indigo, the city lights pop and…VOILA! Instant cityscape! Take note that you will need a sturdy tripod and be practiced up on your long exposure shooting. Many of these images are in the range of 5 – 20 seconds, so you must take special care not to bump the camera, thus rendering the image soft.

Cityscape image of Vancouver, BC

Cityscape image of Vancouver, BC

2. Provide Some Context 
Rather than just shoot frame-filling city, why not include a bit of context in the image. Take this example of Vancouver. With its beautiful walking trails winding through coastal bays, Vancouver is a thriving urban area intertwined with spectacular natural surroundings. Consider different ways to frame and present the city that you’re shooting—these types of images can be especially attractive to magazines and other editorial outlets.

Cityscape image of Seattle with storm clouds at sunset as shot from Alki Beach

Cityscape image of Seattle with storm clouds at sunset as shot from Alki Beach

3. Search Out Dramatic Weather 
While I could put this tip in nearly every one of my blog posts regarding so many different types of shooting, I feel it is especially true with cityscapes. Many times, we find ourselves shooting cityscapes from iconic locations. These locations are popular for a reason, as often times they offer the best views and vantage points. This means it is not entirely uncommon to come away with an image that is quite similar to so many others out there. The one separating factor when shooting from these iconic locations that we can utilize to our advantage is dramatic weather. This image, taken from Alki Beach near Seattle, WA is nothing revolutionary in and of itself. However, I was fortunate to be rewarded with a stormy sunset, which separates it from many of the other images shot from this location.

Cityscape image of San Francisco's Painted Ladies at dusk

Cityscape image of San Francisco’s Painted Ladies at dusk

4. Compress the Scene for Heightened Visual Interest 
Many city overlooks feature impressive foreground and background subject matter. This serves as the perfect opportunity to pull out a telephoto lens and compress the scene. By compressing the scene, we are effectively pulling the background in very tight to our foreground, thus adding depth and dimensionality to our images which gives the viewer a much more three dimensional experience when viewing the image.

Travel image of downtown Partenkirchen, Germany at dusk

Travel image of downtown Partenkirchen, Germany at dusk

5. Use a Tilt-shift Lens for Creative Control 
The tilt-shift look has become increasingly popular of late. Just bring up your Instagram feed and see how many images come up with that snow globe, dream-like feel. It’s likely that most of those images have been given the effect after capture, but if you happen to have a tilt-shift lens in your arsenal, you can capture this type of image upon clicking the shutter button. Without getting overly technical, tilt-shift lenses let you keep a “slice” of the image in focus, thus drawing the viewer’s attention to a particular part of the frame that is different, and (at times) far more effective than just shooting at shallow apertures. Given you use it modestly, this effect can be super fun, and serves as a great alternative to shooting a traditional cityscape image.

Fine art travel image of East Jerusalem, Israel in black and white

Fine art travel image of East Jerusalem, Israel in black and white

6. See in Black and White
As is apparent in this post, it seems most of the cityscape images we see are in color. However, many cities present themselves exceptionally well in monochrome. This hazy late evening image of East Jerusalem is one such example. Next time you come home from shooting cityscapes, try processing a select few in black & white. This might help you to “see” BW cityscapes in the future.

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7. Try Something New
As I say with most every tutorial I write, try shedding the above “rules” of shooting better cityscapes and let your heart and creative vision guide you. Try a new angle, a new time of day or night or a different lens. Look for new and intriguing ways to capture your city. Save up some money and book a helicopter for a completely different view of what’s below. Find something that excites you, and then run with it. Good luck!

Video: Falling for Kata Israel Workshop

I had the wonderful opportunity to spend some time with the  awesome crew of employees at Kata Bags this past November. Based in Jerusalem, Israel, Kata has been a legit player in the photo backpack arena for some time now. While I don’t “officially” endorse Kata Bags, they make a stellar product, and I truly enjoyed the time spent with them in their beautiful country. Check out the video above for a look at our time together, or visit http://www.kata-bags.com/About+Kata/Activities/Falling+For+Kata/FALLING+FOR+KATA/18164170 for a more in depth look.

Cooperative Ibex at the Ramon Crater, Israel.

The Moment

Image of Monastere St. Claire, Jerusalem, Israel captured by AdamBarkerPhotography

I’m actually not speaking at all about the moment of which many of you are likely thinking. It’s not that magic moment. The moment the shutter clicks. I’m actually thinking about the moment I transitioned in my photographic approach from amateur to professional.This moment occurred when I decided to never postpone nor pass up an opportunity to photograph. All of those times I’d said to myself, “I’ll just get it next time” came to a head, and I realized that next time, no matter how special and unique, would ever be the same as that moment right then.

This image of a small, unknown monastery in Jerusalem, never would have been captured had my approach not been altered many years ago.

I was walking home from a sunrise shoot of the city, when I passed several nuns entering the grounds to the monastery. I walked past them several feet, intent on returning to my hotel to eat breakfast. I paused, turned around, and walked through the gate. I followed the nuns to the monastery doors, where a short discussion in Italian ensued and they invited me in to observe the service.

Except for the words of the sermon, and the occasional singing from the choir, it was silent. I quickly changed lenses and set up my tripod before entering the chapel itself, as to make as little noise as possible.

I knew, as soon as I entered through the chapel doors that this was a special place, not only in religious terms, but this was a visual gold mine. Warm, diffused light was entering through large windows on the east side. It enveloped the room with promise. Light, lines and story all converged to make for an outstanding and unforgettable scene. This, truly, was a moment.

Shalom!

"A" for effort, no?

From Jerusalem!

After a hefty number of hours in the air, I touched down in Tel Aviv to find a pleasant man named Michel waiting to take me to Jerusalem. I’ve been here less than 5 hrs, and can already feel the fantastic vibe of a city steeped in history. I managed a very quick and impromptu dusk session from the hotel balcony, and I’ll be spending the next several days in the Jordan desert with the crew from Manfrotto/Kata Backpacks. Can’t wait to share some imagery from this unique part of the world!

East Jerusalem at Dusk