The Value of Vision

Image of William Atkin House at This is The Place Heritage State Park in Salt Lake City, UT by AdamBarkerPhotography

It’s so easy these days to reduce photography to nothing more than pressing a button on the latest camera, with the latest lens, packed in the latest backpack, etc. etc. etc. There’s no question that photography has much to do with equipment. It’s also true that generally speaking, better equipment will yield better results, assuming the photographer has the technical knowledge necessary to utilize the added features and from more advanced equipment. It is most true, however, that exceptional photographers rely on that which is in their head, and not in their hands to produce imagery that will rise above the clutter of mediocrity.

Which brings me to this image from this morning’s shoot in Salt Lake City. I hadn’t planned on shooting this house. I hadn’t really even planned on shooting at all to be honest. But I woke up and the skies looked promising and I needed to breathe some cold air. The skies certainly delivered, but I soon realized that my vision for the scene in front of me had nothing to do with vibrant, cheery color.

This home is a replica of one built in 1877 by a mormon settler named William Atkin. It was located eight miles south of St. George on a 160-acred farm that later became the one-family town of Atkinville.

A one-family town in the middle of nowhere–I’m sure they saw some beautiful sunrises, but I can also imagine the over-abundance of hardships encountered in such an endeavor as well. Lonely. Bleak. Cold. And thus was born this image, which has moderate resemblance to the original (below). I can tell you exactly how I did this, but I’d rather you simply study the image and answer that for yourself. It’s about externalizing the internal thought process at the time of capture, and relies more on cognitive decision-making when shooting the image than reactive experimentation on the computer after the fact.

What’s the point of all this babble? The point is this: if you have no personal investment or direction in the final result of what you hope to create when you click the shutter, there really is very little substantive story-telling to be showcased. Without a story, you have no audience.

It’s likely that I will embrace the in-camera version of this image at some point. After all, I am a sucker for colored up clouds, and it is a beautiful and serene scene. However, on this morning, this was my vision. Vision has value. It’s value is far greater than the latest and greatest doohickey that just hit the interwebz. Vision, or the lack thereof, is ultimately a very large factor in whether you will succeed or fail in your quest to produce exceptional imagery.

Upcoming: PDN Outdoor Photo Expo, Aug 4-5 2011

If you have even the most minute desire to better your photography, and you live within even a couple hours’ drive of Salt Lake City, pack your bags and get on your horse for the first annual PDN Outdoor Photo Expo sponsored by Pictureline. I am ecstatic to be presenting among names like Art Wolfe, Frans Lanting, George Lepp, Scott Markewitz, Kevin Winzeler, David Stoecklein, Jimmy Chin, Tim Kemple and many, many others. Holy wow! Look at that lineup. It’s like an all-you-can-learn smorgasbord of photography technique and vision from a cast of all-stars.

My presentation on capturing engaging Environmental Active Lifestyle images takes place August 5 from 3-5 pm. Register for my seminar, and many others here. I’ll be sharing insight into where, when and how to create stunning active lifestyle images that speak to viewers and connect on a level that makes them want to go, do and see. We’ll talk composition, exposure, athlete communication and how to use landscape filters to eclipse all the other average imagery out there. There will be giveaways from my sponsors including Clikelite backpacks and Mountain Khakis and Singh Ray Filters. Come check out the AdamBarkerPhotography/Mark Miller Subaru Outback. It’s even cooler in person!  Finally, I’ll be presenting a slideshow of some of my most prized active lifestyle imagery from the past several years.

The Better You Know, The More You’ll Go

Sunset over Salt Lake City, UT

How well do you know your surroundings? Your local stomping grounds, so to speak. Do you know what weather is most likely to produce good atmospheric conditions for scenic photography? Do you have locations picked out for just such a morning or evening? If the answer isn’t “yes” to all of the above, consider doing a little bit of homework as you drive to/from work, when you’re out on a hike, or even just walking the dog.

Just after helping my wife put the kids to bed last night, I looked outside to see…not much. However, there was a faint atmospheric glow, and I just had that feeling that something inspiring may come to pass. I had seen it before, and most importantly, I knew there was an approaching cold front. Pre-frontal days here in Salt Lake City seem to produce impressive sunsets more often than not.

So I grabbed my Clikelite Escape (already packed mind you!) and headed to a location on the foothills that I had scouted several weeks earlier. I was wearing flip flops. Worth pointing out, as the easier it is, the more likely we are to go get after it. This location was a mere 50 yards from a certain dead end road. Drive. Park. Hike for 30 seconds. Set up tripod. Click shutter. Enjoy nature’s light show. Pack up. Head home.

Pretty cut and dry. Lesson? The better acquainted you are with both your local shooting locations and the local weather nuances, the more likely you are to make a go of capturing some memorable imagery. Keep a mental list. Even better–write stuff down. Carry a little book and keep a list of places that would be good to shoot at sunset, sunrise, in storm light, in spring, in fall, in winter, etc. You’ll not regret it!

Release: Mark Miller Subaru named Official Vehicle Sponsor of AdamBarkerPhotography


Mark Miller Subaru named Official Vehicle Sponsor of AdamBarkerPhotography

April 11, 2011 (Salt Lake City) – Utah-based landscape and active lifestyle photographer Adam Barker and Mark Miller Subaru have teamed up to create the ultimate photo gear hauler and mobile adventure center.

Wrapped in stunning AdamBarkerPhotography imagery, the 2011 Subaru Outback 3.6R is a moving representation of western imagery combined with the latest in all-wheel-drive technology to access each location.

“This relationship with Mark Miller Subaru has been an ideal way to showcase the best outdoor adventure vehicle and images of the same,” said Barker. “Whether I’m driving up Little Cottonwood Canyon in a foot of snow or on a sandy road in the desert, I need a vehicle that can carry all of my equipment and give me the confidence to get where I need to go.”

Sporting everything from mobile internet and mobile,find out more at badcreditmobiles.net, to an integrated GPS navigation system and even a convenient 110V Power Source, the all-wheel drive Outback is equipped to provide Barker with everything he needs to get to the locations that consistently offer opportunities for capturing magazine quality images. Upon arrival, Barker is able to utilize the vehicle as a mobile office – uploading, editing and sharing imagery on site.

“As a renowned and critically acclaimed photographer, Adam Barker is a fantastic ambassador for the Mark Miller Subaru brand. We look forward to working with Adam and utilizing his positive influence over his social media fans and followers to further expand our marketing outreach,” says Jeff Miller, General Manager of Mark Miller Subaru South Towne.

Additional vehicle sponsors include major outerwear brand Arc’teryx as well as Suunto, a leading designer and manufacturer of sports precision instruments.

About photographer Adam Barker

Adam Barker is an award-winning photographer and noted educator specializing in scenic landscape, active lifestyle and destination imagery. His work has been featured in numerous publications including Outdoor Photographer, Ski, Skiing, Volkswagen’s Das Auto, American Angler, The Drake, Fly Fisherman, the Flyfish Journal,  USA Today and many more. Visit www.adambarkerphotography.com to view his work.

About Mark Miller Subaru

Mark Miller Subaru has been selling and servicing new and used Subaru vehicles since 1971.  With two locations at 3535 South State Street in Salt Lake City and 10920 South State Street in Sandy, they are able to provide great customer service for the entire Wasatch Front.  Visit www.markmillersubaru.com to view their inventory, see their specials, order a part or schedule a service appointment.

Contacts:

AdamBarkerPhotography

Adam Barker

801-550-9141

adam@adambarkerphotography.com

www.adambarkerphotography.com

Mark Miller Subaru

George Rosca, Digital Marketing Manager

801-553-5217

georger@markmiller.com

www.markmillersubaru.com



Sneak Peek: Through the Eyes

We’ve been busy creating the first of many episodes of AdamBarkerPhotography: Through the Eyes. Check out the teaser for the first below. Special thanks to Snowbird Ski & Summer Resort for the sick location! Huge shout out to Hammers Inc Photography and Nate Balli for the mad film/edit skills.

Through the Eyes Teaser EP1 from HIP VISUAL ARTS on Vimeo.

One of Those Images…

That I simply can’t let go of.

A lone bison atop a ridge. Shot last night at Antelope Island State Park. So many underlying messages in this shot. Let’s just leave it at that, or I might ruin everything else with words.

Lone Bison. Antelope Island State Park, UT

Set a New Standard with Singh Ray Filters

My photographic career is still in its relative infancy, yet I’ve already been fortunate to shoot a wide range of imagery for an even more expansive array of industries. Whether I’m out on a scenic landscape shoot for my own collection, or racing first light for the next commercial client, I always, always have my Singh Ray filters with me.Through my experience, I’ve found that regardless of the type of imagery you’re shooting, the challenges remain largely the same. Something in your frame is often times too bright or too dark leaving the image incomplete without some aid in helping the camera’s sensor to see what your eye is seeing.

Architectural image by AdamBarkerPhotography. Shot at Deer Valley Resort with a Singh Ray 2-stop Hard Step Grad ND Filter

Architectural image by AdamBarkerPhotography. Shot at Deer Valley Resort with a Singh Ray 2-stop Hard Step Grad ND Filter

To use an overly used term, we, as photographers are taught to “think outside the box”. We are taught to find something different to separate ourselves from those less qualified. I have found that by employing my Singh Ray filters in less conventional situations, I am able to deliver a superior image. Sure, you could use artificial lighting in many of these situations, but filters are far less cumbersome. This post is littered with examples of both the more and less conventional uses of Singh Ray filters. Hopefully, you come away inspired to use your filters in ways you never previously imagined.

This first image (top of the post) was made at Deer Valley Resort, UT. When shooting images for a client, it’s important to understand what message they are trying to send through their imagery. I enjoy shooting architectural work, particularly architectural work in the mountain lifestyle genre. I connect well with this type of imagery because I love and live the mountain lifestyle. I understand what it is people hope for when visiting a world class resort. They hope for cold outside and warm inside. They hope for a larger than life winter wonderland. They hope for cozy, comfortable and TBD (to be discovered).

I am able to convey this feeling by enhancing the warm appearance of the lodge on a cold winter’s eve. A 2-stop hard step Grad ND was used to balance and even slightly darken the sky, giving a natural vignette that draws the eye directly to the lodge. Dusk is a fantastic time to use Grad ND filters, as the rich blue sky is deeply saturated and void of harsh contrast.

Sunrise skiing image of Todd Ligare at Alta Ski Area by AdamBarkerPhotography. Captured with a Singh Ray 3-stop Reverse ND Grad Filter.

Sunrise skiing image of Todd Ligare at Alta Ski Area by AdamBarkerPhotography. Captured with a Singh Ray 3-stop Reverse ND Grad Filter.

This second image embodies two of my life’s greatest pleasures: skiing pow, and the warm, soft glow of first light. Images like this require foresight, preparation and a desire to capture something not many others can. I am a big believer in capturing nothing less than a complete image. There are countless photographers out there who could shoot a similar image, but the sky would simply be void of detail, tone and color.

With my background in scenic photography, I’m always particular about making sure the sky is given its just attention, regardless of whether it is a secondary part of the image or not. I hand held a 3-stop reverse ND Grad on this image to ensure no detail was lost. The result is a pleasing, complete image, with pink light so sweet you could drink it up, and a sky with detail to boot.

There are two key things to remember when shooting an image like this (with a hand held filter): 1) make sure to communicate with your skier as to exactly where you’d like the turn/action to take place. 2) Find the proper position for your filter, and don’t move with the skier—keep your camera steady and resist the urge to pan with the skier. This will ensure your initial filter placement doesn’t get skewed and lend an unnatural look to parts of the image.

Sunset image of Volkswagen Jetta Sportwagon TDI at Saguara National Park by AdamBarkerPhotography. Captured using a Singh Ray 4-stop Reverse ND Grad Filter.

Sunset image of Volkswagen Jetta Sportwagon TDI at Saguara National Park by AdamBarkerPhotography. Captured using a Singh Ray 4-stop Reverse ND Grad Filter.

This next image shows a classic commercial scenic image. It’s not too far off from what many of us do when heading out for a standard scenic sunset shoot: find an engaging composition, hope for great sunset light and shoot away.

This image was made during an editorial shoot for Volkswagen’s Das Auto magazine in Saguaro National Park. The art director for the shoot stood there mesmerized as he watched the 4-stop Reverse ND Grad work its magic, effectively bringing the image to life on the liveview display. One thing worth mentioning is the incredible ease that liveview shooting offers us. If your camera has liveview, make a habit of using it! It’s so much easier to pinpoint filter lines, and to see in real time how the filter is balancing out your exposure/histogram.

Architectural image shot at Deer Valley Resort by AdamBarkerPhotography. Captured using a Singh Ray 2-stop soft step Grad ND Filter.

Architectural image shot at Deer Valley Resort by AdamBarkerPhotography. Captured using a Singh Ray 2-stop soft step Grad ND Filter.

This winter I have been shooting a great deal of architectural imagery. I am a student of existing light (read: I’m terrible with flash photography). Interior lighting can certainly pose some unique challenges when shooting architectural imagery. My preferred time to shoot is at dusk or dawn, when the ambient light balances with the interior light, and you get that soft purple glow in the windows. (Please note that there are countless other ways to shoot architectural imagery, this is simply my preferred method and style).

Even if the exterior/interior light are balanced, however, there still may be hot spots in your image. On a whim, I began using my soft step Grad ND filters to balance out these lighting obstacles. The results were more than pleasing, and before long, I found myself shooting with Grad ND filters inside as much as I do outside. Soft step grads are the perfect filter for this type of imagery as there is little in the way of a defined filter line. Experiment with grad ND filters the next time you shoot interior architectural imagery—it’s much less expensive than an extensive lighting setup, and there’s no setup at all!

Fly fishing image of Andrew Swindle on the Middle Provo River, UT by AdamBarkerPhotography. Captured using a Singh Ray 3-stop Reverse ND Grad Filter.

Fly fishing image of Andrew Swindle on the Middle Provo River, UT by AdamBarkerPhotography. Captured using a Singh Ray 3-stop Reverse ND Grad Filter.

These last two images demonstrate classic uses of a Reverse ND Grad filter. I am a sunstar fanatic, and have found that with the combination of my 3-stop reverse ND grad and my Canon 16-35mm MkII  (and a bit of help from Mother Nature), I’m able to create dynamic images rich in color and detail, with the added bonus of a sharp, succinct sunstar. The ideal time to capture images like this is right as the sun is either cresting above or dipping below the horizon line.

Scenic image of barrel cactus and sunset at Tucson Mountain Park near Saguaro National Park by AdamBarkerPhotography. Captured using a Singh Ray 4-stop Reverse ND Grad Filter.

Scenic image of barrel cactus and sunset at Tucson Mountain Park near Saguaro National Park by AdamBarkerPhotography. Captured using a Singh Ray 4-stop Reverse ND Grad Filter.

The fly fishing image on the Middle Provo River, UT was shot at sunrise. The cactus image, shot in the Tucson Mountain Park was created at sunset. The “perfect opportunity” will last literally just seconds for this type of image, so take special care to find your composition and adjust your camera settings early, allowing yourself to take advantage of the short period of time in which the sun is just hitting that horizon line.  Take special care to stop your lens down to (at least) f16 or so to ensure a tight, defined sunstar.

Regardless of the imagery or circumstance, don’t leave your Singh Ray filters home. As was mentioned earlier in this post, the images may change, but the challenges remain the same. Take your scenic expertise to other genres of imagery and you will find yourself capable of creating magic wherever the camera takes you.

2010 Ski Salt Lake Shootout: That’s a Wrap

For the last three years, I (with the help of Ski Salt Lake and the Cottonwood Canyons resorts) have hosted a ski-based photography competition called the Ski Salt Lake Shootout. It’s a frenetic mess of photographers, athletes, loads of equipment, inevitable cell phone exhaustion and always, exceptional photography. I know by now that, for five days, I am encased in a veritable bubble of shutter clicking, bro-brah-ing, thumbs-upping, and little, if any…sleep.

Andy Jacobsen, making sure gravity is taking time off the clock at Alta Ski Area during the 2010 Ski Salt Lake Shootout.

Andy Jacobsen, making sure gravity isn't taking time off the clock at Alta Ski Area during the 2010 Ski Salt Lake Shootout.

In the end, however, the visual and emotional rewards are extremely gratifying. It’s humbling to see what the photographers and athletes are able to produce within such a short window of time. It’s always great to see how other photographers see, and to talk shop with others in the biz. This year we were blessed with a mix of weather conditions and what seemed like consistently good (and at times exceptional) snow. The talent pool of athletes here across the Wasatch Front is staggering, and it’s always cool to see how many top level athletes call SLC home.

Photographer Mike Schirf lines things up at Snowbird during the 2010 Ski Salt Lake Shootout.

Photographer Mike Schirf lines things up at Snowbird during the 2010 Ski Salt Lake Shootout.

While I spend the majority of my time documenting the event for awards slideshows and the like, I do search for differing angles from which I can shoot some of my own imagery during the week. Check out the images in this post  for a peek at the action, and I’ll be sure to post a link to the Shootout site as soon as we have the winning images uploaded.

Carston Oliver enjoys a break in the action at Snowbird during the 2010 Ski Salt Lake Shootout.

Carston Oliver enjoys a break in the action at Snowbird during the 2010 Ski Salt Lake Shootout.

Julian Carr, making the best of late light and fresh pow at Alta Ski Area during the 2010 Ski Salt Lake Shootout.

Julian Carr, making the best of late light and fresh pow at Alta Ski Area during the 2010 Ski Salt Lake Shootout.

Norwegian photographer Erlend Haugen captures Cody Barnhill at Snowbird during the 2010 Ski Salt Lake Shootout.

Norwegian photographer Erlend Haugen captures Cody Barnhill at Snowbird during the 2010 Ski Salt Lake Shootout.

Carston Oliver, just before the hurt at Snowbird during the 2010 Ski Salt Lake Shootout.

Carston Oliver, just before the hurt at Snowbird during the 2010 Ski Salt Lake Shootout.

Julian Carr checks his takeoff at Alta Ski Area during the 2010 Ski Salt Lake Shootout.

Julian Carr checks his takeoff at Alta Ski Area during the 2010 Ski Salt Lake Shootout.

Andy Jacobsen sends it at Alta Ski Area during the 2010 Ski Salt Lake Shootout.

Andy Jacobsen sends it at Alta Ski Area during the 2010 Ski Salt Lake Shootout.

Jared Allen takes a break from/for the camera at Brighton Resort during the 2010 Ski Salt Lake Shootout.

Jared Allen takes a break from/for the camera at Brighton Resort during the 2010 Ski Salt Lake Shootout.

Working a Scene Like the Local Buffett

So here’s a question for all you blog readers and photographers out there. When you sit down to chow at your favorite all-you-can-eat buffet, do you simply peck at the salad bar, or do you dive in head first and fill your plate to overflowing with delicacies beyond all earthly comprehension???  I’m guessing the answer is the latter. And if it’s not, you need to check yourself for a meeting with Maury Povich and his never fail lie detector test. Nobody goes to an all-you-can-eat buffet with any other intention than to take full, unadulterated advantage of the calorie-laden offerings on hand.

So what does this have to do with photography? For those of you that managed to stick with me, instead of sticking it to your local convenience store–it is this: It’s time to quit pecking at the proverbial salad bar of photo buffets. When you wake your tired bones up at the crack of dawn, or stay out past sunset, the least you can do is work your particular location until your visual and creative appetite has been satisfied. There is a fine line beween running around like a chicken with its head cut off, and properly working a scene. If you can find the balance, and prepare yourself accordingly, you will leave your photo shoots with so much more than just one or two keepers.  Suer, they may not all be that life-altering contest winner, but they’ll showcase your versatility as a photographer, and commitment to carrying your imagery forward.

For the purpose of this blog post, I have posted a number of fall images shot within a 1/4 mile radius over a period of 24 hrs. The greater majority were actually shot within a period of a couple hours from the same tripod location.  Read on for a couple of tips on taking full advantage of a every photo location you visit.

Cascade Springs, UT in Fall

Cascade Springs, UT in Fall

1. Know the area. Having a sure knowledge of the area you plan to shoot is unbeatable. It helps to have visited the location beforehand at different times of day and at different seasons. If you’re unfamiliar with the area, utilize the all-knowing interweb and drum up as much info as possible.

Cascade Springs, UT in Fall

Cascade Springs, UT in Fall

2. Keep your eye on the prize. I always like to have one potential 5-star image in mind when I go to a particular spot. This will help you not to leave empty handed. As that magical moment begins to take shape for the image you pre-visualized, pay attention to the surroundings, but resist the temptation to move locations unless you’re absolutely sure you have enough time to set yourself up once again for that fabled 5-star shot.

Cascade Springs, UT in Fall

Cascade Springs, UT in Fall

3. Forget what I just said. There are times when Mother Nature will be hitting us across the face with her giant frying pan and we’re just too stubborn to pay attention. Know when a better opportunity presents itself. It’s hard to describe exactly how and when this happens, but after enough practice, you will simply be able to see when you need to run like hell and capture an angle different than the one you had previously anticipated.

Cascade Springs, UT in Fall

Cascade Springs, UT in Fall

4. Just change your lens. Many times we are able to capture an entirely different take from the exact same tripod location simply by throwing on a longer or wider lens. Fine tune your ability to “see” as if you were looking through your different lenses. This is an unbelievably beneficial skill in learning how to capture fleeting moments that don’t allow you enough time to throw on every lens in your collection “just to have a peek”. Telephoto and wide angle zoom lenses can be particularly useful when practicing this, as they will account for a number of different focal lengths within their given range. Don’t forget to experiment with both vertical and horizontal compositions!

Cascade Springs, UT in Fall

Cascade Springs, UT in Fall

5. Anticipate. Just as an athlete anticipates his opponent’s next move, we can anticipate what may happen as Mother Nature makes the magic happen. Anticipate where the light will fall, and how it will affect the particular composition for which you are set up. Look for opportunities to capture skim light as the sun crests mountain peaks. If you’re not capturing this light within the first 30 seconds, you’re too late. Anticipate! (hey, that rhymes…)

Cascade Springs, UT in Fall

Cascade Springs, UT in Fall

6. Visit often. The better you know a location, the better you can take advantage of it in differing conditions. Study the location and know it well enough to ace the next test Mother Nature throws your way.

Upgrade your Creativity

With the announcement of the new Canon EOS 7D, I’ve been thinking a bunch about how quickly technology is advancing these days. If you look at what we were shooting digital images with just 5 years ago, the advancements are mind blowing. It would appear, that it’s becoming easier to shoot “good” images and becoming increasingly harder to stand out as a photographer and create imagery that one remembers. In this world of visual distractions (and attractions), only the technically sound and (perhaps more importantly) the creatively innovative will be able to produce imagery that will stand the test of time.

Fall color, perfect for photography in Little Cottonwood Canyon, UT

Fall color, perfect for photography in Little Cottonwood Canyon, UT

Here’s a frightening statistc: Online photo sharing site Flickr hosts more than 3.5 billion images. An average of 3 million images are uploaded daily. You read that right. 3 million images are uploaded EVERY DAY. How, in the name of Ansel, are you going to produce something that stands out?

A hiker gazes in wonder at a tree growing through red rock canyons on Wallstreet, Bryce Canyon National Park

A hiker gazes in wonder at a tree growing through red rock canyons on Wallstreet, Bryce Canyon National Park

Here is some food for thought. Instead of upgrading your camera, lens, computer, memory card, huge 30″ monitor, new zoom lens, tripod, filters, cable release, operating system, editing software, backpack, lens cap, camera belt, lens cleaning solution, dust remover or any other piece of the endless list of equipment we all use, try this: UPGRADE YOUR CREATIVITY. Manufacturers produce new cameras nearly every quarter these days, but how often do we upgrade our ability not just to create, but to see better imagery.

Morning storm clouds and mist over the Wasatch Mountains, east of Salt Lake City, UT

Morning storm clouds over the Wasatch Mountains, east of Salt Lake City, UT

Read a good book. Follow an inspiring blog. Give yourself a challenging assignment. Fail. Succeed. And then do it all over again. And here’s the important part–do it with your own style and panache.

Trail running in late evening light through the foothills above Salt Lake City, UT

Trail running in late evening light through the foothills above Salt Lake City, UT

Here’s another idea: Build your own better version of you. How long have you been running on Joe v1.1 or Sarah v1.2. It’s time to upgrade to version 1.5, or better yet, give yourself an entire system upgrade and find Bill v2.0. Sleeker, faster, smoother, more efficient, and a creative animal beyond compare. Hey! I’d buy it!

A few stout sprigs of Indian Paintbrush stand resolutely beneath towering aspen trees in Big Cotonwood Canyon, UT

A few stout sprigs of Indian Paintbrush stand resolutely beneath towering aspen trees in Big Cotonwood Canyon, UT

The longer I am in the business of photography, the harder it gets to challenge myself to be a better version of me. Resist the temptation to become a better Chase Jarvis or Art Wolfe or even (gasp) Adam Barker. Much like looking at a road map, the work of established photographers doesn’t speak so much to the destination as it does to the journey. There are a million ways to arrive at the pinnacle, why follow a path already trodden?

A bent rod and tight line on the Weber River, UT

A bent rod and tight line on the Weber River, UT